Twin Cities Gay and Lesbian Community Oral History Project: Interview with Jean-Nicholas Tretter
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Description BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION: Jean-Nicholas Tretter is a native Minnesotan. He traces his family back to pre-territorial days in Minnesota. Following the death of his logger father in 1958, his mother moved the family to St. Paul. Following his graduation from Alexander Ramsey Senior High School, Tretter joined the Navy. He served from 1964-1972, during the time of the Vietnam War. After leaving the Navy, Tretter returned to the Twin Cities. SUBJECTS DISCUSSED: Tretter discusses in depth his awareness of his sexuality, his life as a gay teen in the 1960s and his coming out in the 1970s. Also, Tretter details the history of bathhouses in Minnesota and the connection between the Italian mafia and the ownership of gay bars. Additionally, he also tells of the political activity of the Twin Cities gay community, their involvement with the DFL party and his personal involvement with the Minnesota Committee for Gay and Lesbian Rights. Tretter defines terms used in the gay community, referred to as "gay speak" and describes with detail the dating rituals and customs that existed. He speaks about his role in the organization of gay sports teams, the Minnesota contingent in the Gay Games, Gay Pride celebrations and Fresh Fruit Radio.
Quantity 4 hours sound cassette
49 pages transcript
Format Content Category: sound recordings
Content Category: text
Measurements 03:16:02 running time
Creation Interviewee: Tretter, Jean-Nicholas
Interviewer: Paulsen, Scott
Made in Saint Paul, Ramsey County, Minnesota, United States
Subjects Made in Saint Paul, Ramsey County, Minnesota, United States
Dates Creation: 12/20/1993
Holding Type Oral History - Interview
Identifiers OH 42
Accession Number AV1994.173.7
More Info MHS Library Catalog
Related Collections Oral History - Project, MHS Collection, project: 'Twin Cities Gay and Lesbian Community Oral History Project'

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