Oral history interviews with Ernest C. Oberholtzer
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Description Ernest C. Oberholtzer was born in 1884 in Davenport, Iowa, and died in 1977 in International Falls, Minnesota. He is known as an explorer, conservationist, and writer. Educated at Harvard University, Oberholtzer took a B.A. in landscape architecture in 1907, and remained at Harvard to do some graduate work. In 1908 he traveled to England and Scotland with his college friend Conrad Aiken. In 1909 Oberholtzer first explored the border lakes in the Rainy Lake watershed area in northern Minnesota and southern Canada. By agreement the Canadian Northern Railroad bought OberholtzerÂ’s notes and pictures documenting canoe routes in the area. Oberholtzer worked for a short time as a newspaper editor and in 1910 went again to Europe, this time with a friend, Harry French. Oberholtzer briefly served as vice consul in Hanover, Germany, before returning to northern Minnesota in 1912. In 1912 Oberholtzer traveled to Hudson's Bay with an Indian companion, Billy Magee. The same year Oberholtzer moved to Rainy Lake, spending summers on an island, "The Mallard," and winters on a houseboat at Ranier. He often traveled the area with Indian companions, particularly Billy Magee of Mine Centre, Ontario, and was a friend of the Indians as well as a teller of their stories and legends. Oberholtzer is best known throughout the United States and Canada for his ceaseless role in preserving the Quetico-Superior wilderness. He was instrumental in the founding of the Wilderness Society. Oberholtzer worked for the establishment of the Boundary Waters Canoe Area and Voyageur National Park and received many honors for his part in conservation work. COMMENTS ON INTERVIEWS: In general, the tapes in this series contain interviews with Oberholtzer, his commentary on lantern slides he made, and some recordings made by Oberholtzer in interviewing some of his Ojibwe Indian friends. See the attached introduction for further description of each interview. Transcripts or partial transcripts exist (in draft form) for interviews 1-8 and 12. The audio recording for interview 7 is no longer available.
Quantity 32.5 hours sound cassette
383 pages transcript
Format Content Category: sound recordings
Content Category: text
Measurements 23:56:53 running time
Creation Interviewee: Oberholtzer, Ernest C. (Ernest Carl)
Interviewer: Andrews, Frances Elizabeth
Interviewer: Fridley, Russell W.
Interviewer: Hart, Evan A.
Interviewer: Heffelfinger, Frank Peavey Jr.
Interviewer: Kane, Lucile M.
Interviewer: Monahan, George
Interviewer: Monahan, Gene Ritchie
Interviewer: Nagle, Mary
Dates Creation: 1948 - 1968
(Interviews conducted 1948, 1960(?), 1963, 1964, and 1968.)
Holding Type Oral History - Project
Identifiers OH 81
Accession Number AV2000.27
More Info MHS Library Catalog

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